Category Archives: Talk

Markers tour feedback

..the guided tour was not only an insight into the physical environment of The Royal Edinburgh Hospital but a much privileged access to the environment of a patient’s mind. The lady who took us around really took us back to moments she experienced whilst in that facility, sometimes humorous, often full of pathos but always insightful and honest authenticity. The result was a step into a world, god forbid, that you would never really want to visit as a patient, yet knowing full well that if you ever needed to, you would be in the best of all places at the Royal Edinburgh, cared for and understood and guided towards recovery and rehabilitation. People need to know more about mental illness and its treatments to help reduce persisting stigma and misunderstood ideas of what it is really like. The 200th anniversary events enable this to take place.

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Voices from the past

Some very lovely feedback ………. today’s event was a perfect complement to Mark Dion’s exhibition, making the theme of mental illness all the more clear and bringing it to life with stories across time. It was as if we were sitting in or eavesdropping on conversations – and if as a visitor to the event today, you weren’t affected by those words then you aren’t really very human!

Pauline Goldsmith, the actress was excellent and Ruth Honeybone was very good too, but the credit must really go to Artlink

Rehearsal

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The performance

PIONEERS OF MADNESS episode 3

Listen in this Wednesday at 1.30pm for the third part of the series on BBC Radio Scotland. image

MARKERS TOUR – 25th January

imageEVER / PRESENT / PAST /

CELEBRATING
200 YEARS

Saturday 25th January
2pm to 3pm
Meet at 2pm Car park, MacKinnon House

Markers Tour. BOOK SOON AS SPACES VERY LIMITED

An Alternative Tour of the Royal Edinburgh Hospital
A series of small wall paintings have started to appear around the hospital. ‘Calling Cards’ from past and present patients within the hospital.

Each painting has been placed in a space which is of personal significance to the person who painted the picture. It just so happens that each of the spaces also has had a number of different identities over the past 200 years. This walking tour will provide people with stories about each of the paintings, the personal significance of each space and stories of the corridors, wards and rooms of this Victorian Psychiatric institution. There is a guidebook written by Nicola White to accompany each tour.

To book call Artlink on: 0131 229 3555 OR BOOK HERE

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Pioneers of Madness episode 2

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LISTEN HERE to a very interesting second episode about the patients experience.

Arthur Conan Doyle & his father

A brilliant thought provoking talk. Owen and Ronnie gave the audience an interesting insight into the impact of having a parent with mental ill health and the repercussions.   Truly enlightening.
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Pioneers of Madness – radio programme

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LISTEN HERE

Edi Stark explores 200 years of pioneering mental health care at the Royal Edinburgh Hospital.

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Arthur Conan Doyle and his father

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Talbot Rice Gallery, Tuesday 14th January 2014 at 6pm.

Join Professor Owen Dudley Edwards as he talks about Arthur Conan Doyle, exploring his relationship with his father, Charles Altamont Doyle, and its influence on his writing.

Charles Doyle, as well as being father to Arthur, was a gifted artist with a history of mental ill health, spending a good part of his life in mental institutions. Ironically, it was during his time in these institutions, that Charles created some of his best artwork. He created this work to prove his sanity, sending the drawings to his family as proof of his wrongful confinement. In spite of these efforts, he would remain in an asylum for the rest of his life. On the morning of October 10, 1893 Charles suffered from a severe epileptic fit that proved too powerful for his weakened heart. He was buried in a graveyard in Dumfries, Scotland.

How did this affect the creator of the world’s greatest detective?

Introduced by Professor Ronnie Jack, esteemed academic and long time friend and colleague of Owen Dudley Edwards.

Professor Owen Dudley Edwards is honorary fellow of the School of History, University of Edinburgh. He is the general editor of the Oxford Sherlock Holmes series, and is a recognised expert on Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

Professor RDS Jack is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh and of the English Association. He holds a personal chair in Scottish and Medieval literature and is a member of the Royal Edinburgh Patients Council.

Radio Scotland Interview

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LISTEN HERE

Twenty-eight minutes and fourty-two seconds into the Culture Studio listen to Trevor Cromie, Nicola White and Claire Barclay talk about Ever, Present, Past.

An Alternative Tour of the Hospital

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A series of small wall paintings started to appear around the hospital. ‘Calling Cards’ from past and present patients within the hospital. Each painting has been placed in a space which is of personal significance to the person who painted the picture. It just so happens that each of the spaces also has had a number of different identities over the past 200 years.

This walking tour will provide people with stories about each of the paintings, the personal significance of each space and stories about the corridors, wards and rooms of this Victorian Psychiatric institution.

On Saturday 7th December we held our first walking tour of the hospital. A small group of people were introduced to the hospital from the perspective of our guides. It was a resounding success!

Participants had the opportunity to hear the wit and wisdom of some amazing people. Look out for the next tour at the end of January.

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Staff tour of Craighouse

Artlink organised a tour of Craighouse. It was so well attended we had to split the tour into two groups. The tour was led by Gordon Mcletchie. For those who don’t know, in the 1880s, Dr Thomas Clouston, Physician Superintendent of the Edinburgh Lunatic Asylum (later the Royal Edinburgh Hospital), oversaw the purchase of Craig House by the managers of the Asylum in 1878. The site was intended for paying patients, and development was funded through the sale of land at the existing Asylum in Morningside. Craighouse was sold to Napier University in the 1980’s.
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